May 7

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On the Hunt for 13+ Great Canadian Grandfathers

By Mark Leblanc

May 7, 2022


On the Hunt for 13+ Great Canadian Grandfathers

Hello…

 

Today’s date is May 2 / 2022

 

I’m about to attempt a serious cut and paste exercise over the course of the next several paragraphs…please pay close attention to any date changes that accompany the evolving content… 

My intention is to continue writing until the end of this active note, call it “On The Hunt For 13+ Great Canadian Grandfathers”, and then publish the whole article for several distinct purposes and even audiences : 1) as my latest Chez Pa website blog post; 2) as a base chapter situating the e-book I’m writing “On The Hunt …” into introductory context of its fuller goal; 3) serve as a orientation template for the assembled members of the FB group of Great Canadian Grandfathers that I need to find, invite and join in helping me write  the 13 most important pages of our shared virtual e-book journey…

 

August 2021

 

“As of the last publicly available General Social Survey (GSS) on the Canadian Family in 2017, there were 7.5 million grandparents aged 45 and older living in Canada” Snapshot of Canadian grandfathers

 

Hello/Bonjour/Welcome/Bienvenue…

 

This short, but I hope hugely interesting book, is about Canadian grandfathers and the exciting potential of internet small business ownership…

 

Yes, you’re still in the right place…

 

So, from the laptop of a pretty darn good (dare I say it), Great Canadian grandfather, welcome to the opening pages of my very first e-book:

 

Part 1 “As I recall”

 

This chapter will be more of a personalized, “light and breezy”, journal-like approach to the topic rather than one that is academic and theoretical, or that attempts to comprehensively touch on all things “Grandfather”, Canadian or otherwise…

 

Part 2: “Internet business models (IBMs) I have known”

 

This next chapter will still be a personal report on things I’ve learned these past few years, but will also include referenced statements on business models and nuggets of internet guru expertise that I’ve done some sifting through…key features of the business model section will include identifying and describing selected business models and providing information on target audience/niche segments and service offers…

 

Part 3: “On the Hunt for 13 (or more) Great Canadian Grandfathers:

 

This chapter will form the meat and potatoes core offer of this book (or vegan and Keto core offer if you’d prefer) and from where I describe who I’m specifically trying to speak to and why this e-book makes an interesting and worthwhile offer for my readers and for potential internet marketing peers to consider…

 

It will also include a downloadable templates form from where Great Canadian grandfather candidates can be identified and their profile’s submitted…

,

So, If you’re ready, my goodness gracious, let’s go meet my granddaughters…

 

Part 1: As I recall…

 

My name is Mark, and I am a 63-year-old Canadian grandfather.  I retired at age 60 after a full 40-year social service career in Montreal.

 

I began to earnestly write the first draft pages of this book on the evening of the 10th birthday of my eldest granddaughter, whom I lovingly refer to as “My Goodness”.  

 

Her mom (my daughter), her dad (my son-in -law) and eight-year-old sister (“My Gracious”), as well as her Nan and Pa (my wife and I), her great Nanna (my mother-in-law), her GG and GGP (great grandparents-my parents) were all proudly present around the birthday supper celebration table that late afternoon in Montreal.

 

As a developing toddler, My Goodness was the first person to call me her Pa; a name that I immediately liked, found warmly charming and made me feel special and lovingly proud. 

 

Her paternal grandfather, Grandpa (pappy) Harold, maternal great grandpa Peter and I could then each have our own distinct, personalized connection without any risk of tripping over each other as she grew.

 

I also started writing the opening paragraphs of this draft a few weeks before a month-long scheduled trip I had agreed to take to visit my sister and her family in Calgary for one week followed by an additional 3-week trip to hang with my brother and his partner in Nanaimo. BC.

 

And a couple of weeks before the unheralded Canadian Grandparents Day on September 12/21 (more on grandparents’ day 2022 a bit later).

 

Originally conceptualized as a longer-term goal that I would get around to completing eventually, the writing of this book, therefore, has evolved through several different literary iterations including: website blog post; Hero’s Journey essay; a How-To primer/ guide on “starting an internet business” and through all manner of motivational fts and starts typically associated with any of my new, frightening but hopefully worthwhile projects.

 

And as every individual Canadian citizen and planet dweller knows, we’ve also had to continue to live within the intense medical and social throes of Covid 19 pandemic and it’s Delta and, since December, it’s Omicron+ variants.

 

Every evening newscast, it seems, continues to provide its audience with reports on the latest provincial and national/international vaccination update on health options/recommendations and protocols or on news of the latest manifestation of the anti-vaccination/anti mask protest movement.

 

The environmental challenge realities associated with global warming, a new earthquake in Haiti, hurricane Ida, interior Canadian forest fires, the seminal anniversary of 9/11 and its geo-political-cultural changes 20 years later in Afghanistan, the first intense months of an American post Trump/Biden transition period, and a new Canadian federal election have all been relegated to news items of competing and relative importance… 

 

So yes, one can legitimately say that for any first time, wannabe book author or rookie internet business owner either as second career grandfather or as a keen, but new to the private job market novice, these times have been busy or even daunting.

 

So how about we get back to “light and breezy”

 

A Pa is born

 

I was born at two minutes before midnight on April 9th,1959 on my mother, Beatrice’s 20th birthday…My dad had turned twenty ten months earlier in July of 1958… He still likes to tease my mom by saying that I was really born on April 10th but because the nurses felt wistfully nostalgic for the birthday present my mom would have forever lost, they decided to turn the clocks back by 3 minutes…

 

Bea and Pete were married at 19 years of age on June 7th, 1958, and are currently 82 and 83 years of age, respectively.  My mom and dad recently celebrated their 63rd wedding anniversary…

 

They have 5 grandchildren and 6 great grandchildren, several of whom will also be joining us for the family reunion in Calgary scheduled in early September.

 

I am the oldest of four children all of whom grew up in the Montreal southwest burrow of Verdun. 

 

Included among the characteristic features each of us proudly share with our mom is our inherited ability to have an “ear for music” and be able to “carry a tune”.

 

Well…since I’ve already brought you this far back, why don’t you just settle in, get some tea and let me share a few additional stories, or two… (Cue music from The Friendly Giant”).

 

Times may have been a changin’ but they had to start somewhere 

 

One of my fondest early memories is of being part of our grade one classroom Christmas concert at St. Thomas More Catholic Church and being assigned an angelic vocal solo singing “…Sleep in Heavenly Peace, Peace…”

 

Both my parents were in attendance, as was Father Gerald Mc Glyn the respected church pastor and patron of the local elementary school (also called St. Thomas More) that many of us at the concert attended.

 

The song’s memory and the social affirmation afforded to me and my parents by our parish priest were defining developmental features of a proud and happy childhood…

 

My mother Bea and I also shared a passion for following the Montreal Canadiens from the original 6 NHL teams of the 1950s and 60’s and 70’s. My mom’s favourite player was number 16, hall of famer Henri Richard and mine was number 8, hall of famer Dick Duff… 

 

We would faithfully watch games together every Saturday and Wednesday night on Hockey Night in Canada on CBC…my dad rooted for number 11, the non – hall of famer Claude Larose, but that was just for “show” so he could still tease and have someone to comparatively talk to us about after the game…

 

My mom and I loved the Canadiens so much, I even bought her a number 80 Canadiens jersey on her 80th birthday with a captain’s C proudly displayed on the left side of her sweater just above her heart…

 

I am pleased to describe my mother Beatrice lovingly and respectfully as being “my mom, my mom” and forever being “her son, her son”, her Sparky Marky…

 

My father Peter was employed as a police officer (aka: Peace Officer) throughout his entire career at Canadian Pacific Railway. 

 

As a self-taught philosopher/visionary/prophet and an ordained member of the permanent Catholic diaconate of Montreal, my dad is and always has been a champion of social and environmental justice…

 

I am pleased to describe lovingly and respectfully my father Peter. as himself attaining the highest compliment he would ever bestow on friends and peers as being our gentle patriarch and being every inch, a “prince of a man”.

 

Within their respective gifts and spheres of influence, both of my parents led by loving example and demonstrated to their children how it was for each of us could find our path and “walk our walk…”

 

Grandpa Joe Le Blanc and his wife Granny Evelyn (nee Logan) offered their immediate family, including their son Peter and his 3 sisters, a quiet post-war English-speaking east end Montreal presence.  

 

My dad is the remaining surviving member of his family of origin group. 

 

Ongoing connections are intermittently maintained with adult Montreal and Toronto nieces/nephews and cousins via specific family gatherings and through active social media engagements.

 

Grandpa Fred Mitchell and his wife Helen (nee Mullins) also provided access and connection to their daughter, Beatrice, and her four siblings in the East end of Montreal.

 

Ongoing connections with adult family nieces and nephews and cousins from Montreal, Toronto and Los Angeles are intermittently maintained via specific family gatherings and active social media engagements.

 

My mother is the remaining surviving member of her family of origin group 

 

Grandpa Joe died in 1977 at age 70 and his wife Evelyn died 10 years later in 1987 at age 80… 

 

Grandpa Fred died in 1969 at age 59 and his wife Helen died at age 91…

 

Their respective influence and the legacy that they generated among their offspring remain deep within their extended family’s individual and collective memory/meaning and ongoing sense of purpose. RIP

 

I grew up in an English-speaking Catholic family home. Our parents raised their children to follow the sequential dates of the Christian liturgical calendar.

 

Mom and dad were also members of CFM (the Christian Family Movement) which presupposed an adherence to the base of Catholic sacramental practices and values, weekly church attendance (St. Thomas More), and the general institutional structures associated with the papal hierarchy of a Roman Catholic culture…

 

It also foresaw my parents becoming active participants in Montreal’s CCS (Catholic Community Services).  

 

This commitment also included their participation (and at age 7, mine) in the Christian Family Camp, one of the weekly summer camp sessions hosted at Camp Kinkora near St. Agathe in the Quebec Laurentians…

 

Explicit links between the health/socio-cultural/educational and economic community of English Montreal and the CCS and functioning summer Camps at Kinkora, Trails End (TEC) and Camp Orelda-Marian (COM) were all part of the threaded fabric of the era…

 

Now one of the main reasons for my attempting this brief, amateur sociological-historical analysis was so that I could establish context for pivoting back to writing about my own singing…and eventual song and book writing and internet business development ambitions…and to introduce you to my lifelong friends and collaborators Kirk and Nathen and to other members of the 1980’s Folk Music Camp scene.

 

But it still might be a bit too early for that topic transition…without wanting to lose myself or your confidence and interest, there’s more journal-like memory work I still need to do…more hot water for your tea?

 

My St. Thomas More elementary school years ran between September 1965 and June 1971.  There were separate boys’ and girls’ entrances in 1965.

 

As an English public confessional school (Catholic), boys were expected to wear their Sunday best grey flannel trousers and white long sleeve shirts and black shoes and girls to wear their grey or black pinafores also with leotards or white socks and black shoes…

 

The downtown Simpsons, Eaton’s, or the Miracle Mart (in LaSalle) were typically our parents’ choice of back-to-school September shopping locations.

 

I remember returning home one of those early year school days with a generic note advising our parents of an upcoming school commission meeting when information would be shared on introducing a school dress code and recommended wardrobe (for purchase via itemized order form) and on the merging of the boys’ and girls’ sides and on the full gender integration of our individual classrooms.  

 

The proposals were being considered for implementation the next school year.  

 

Anticipated worry among the parents was evident in the nervous school yard chatter displayed by their children: on classroom gender integration behavioural acting out difficulties could be anticipated in mixed classroom settings (tough vs wimpy boys and pretty vs plain girls all completing for the attention of their teachers and their peers); on new, likely increased annual wardrobe costs (do they think our parents are made of money?) while personal per child budget costs for families transitioning from the traditional but free (already owned) Sunday best wear to a purchased school uniform wardrobe had pro and con camps within a respective partisan divide.

 

As with most new things, the dress code wardrobe was settled, and the mixed classes reality established by the beginning of the following school year. 

 

And as with any good foreshadowing literary device worth its salt, let me add that I originally met the mother of our daughter and therefore, the grandmother of our grandchildren, in the integrated grade 7 home room class of Verdun Catholic High School….”Pa and Nan up in a tree” …

 

Sixth not First 

 

I lived with my parents and siblings on 6th avenue in a lower flat 4-plex before moving upstairs to the larger flat in the same block …

 

I’d walk along Bannatyne street, up Moffat or Beatty then over to the school entrance on Manning and then all the way back home again for lunch and to watch an episode of the Flintstones before returning to finish our afternoon classes…

 

Neighborhood friends, Cooney park, Norman Dawe Hockey league, swimming at the Natatorium, skating at the Auditorium or the newly built Guy Gagnon arena, the house league hockey North Stars, the baseball Senators, kids galore, French/English, Catholic/Protestant, boys and girls…bicycles, balls, hockey sticks, skipping ropes and snowbanks everywhere… with nary a helmet nor seatbelt to be found…

 

I felt safe in my fledgling world…

 

My elementary school years 

 

I remember seeing my mother’s tears, as a four-year-old, and hearing her muffled sobs and feeling her anguished incredulity and grief in 1963 when she heard news about the assassination of JFK.  

 

Although I intuitively knew that something strange, important, and sad happened, I was still too developmentally young to display the empathy that would have been expected of an older child.  I was too busy just being an active kid and showing my mom that I was her good boy…

 

I remember the Ed Sullivan show in 1964 and the worldwide advent of Beatlemania

 

I remember Expo 67 and the World’s Fair that was proudly hosted during that exciting and celebratory summer in Montreal. It also offered me a first ever occasion to have access to an international passport…

 

I can still remember every note and word of the Bobby Gimbey song celebrating a Canadian population of 20 million and “the hundredth anniversary of confederation…”

 

I remember Jarry Park, Mack Jonesville, Rusty Staub and the 1968 Montreal Expos…

 

I remember listening to my parents worry about the police strike during the 1969 Murray-Hill riots…

 

I remember the October Crisis of 1970 and the armoured tanks and uniformed soldiers on Beatty Street near our elementary school where our federal MP Bryce Mackesy and his young family resided

 

I remember the variable anxiety and thrill levels associated with Paul Henderson, Vladislav Tretiak, and each game of the full 1972 Canada-Russia hockey summit series

 

I remember Nadia Comaneci and her perfect tens in the 1976 Montreal Olympics and the associated possibilities of getting a first summer job

 

And Beyond

 

Verdun Catholic High School (VCH) between September 1971 and June 1976…

 

More Church (add St. Willibrord, St John Brebouf and St. Gabriels), the introduction of the pastoral animation team of Eric and Father John, the Brown/Green/Orange/Pink House league teams/ the breaking of both of my arms during a painful but embarrassing gym class race episode/ more Kinkora + Folk music camp/ more singing / a new “by invitation only” Christian rock choir named Vision/ a lead part in school musical play/ the graduation committee/our full parents-students-faculty graduation dinner, a thank you speech/our grad dance 

 

But, not to be outdone: 

 

Vanier college between September 1976 and December 1977…

 

The Green room/me and Bbbilly Bbbibbit in Cuckoo’s Nest/Cape Cod/Be Not Afraid (my book intro to Jean Vanier and L’Arche).

 

Dawson college (New School) between January 1978 and June 1979…

 

L’Arche (L’ Esquif); being their first live-in, community assistant between July 1977 and February 1979

 

While I am aware that by offering you a rapid-fire recounting of the explicit details of this biographical trip down memory lane, I may or may not be providing the clearest, most accurate, interesting, or even most enjoyable part of this evolving book that I’m asking you to trust and consider.

I will suggest, though, that it does provide background context for the destiny reflections and later life ambitions that any pretty darn good grandfather (Canadian or otherwise) will certainly be able to relate to…

 

Because, as will eventually be required of any eventual grandfather, in 1979, at the age of 19, I became a dad…

 

Apparently, one look at my daughter’s cute little nose was all the confirmation it took…

 

My 1979 New York minute: 

 

So, in January, I became a dad, and by the middle of February, left the L’Arche home residential community of L’ Esquif in Verdun.   

 

I moved back home to live with my parents (my daughter’s 39- and 40-year-old new paternal grandparents) and my siblings (my daughter’s new paternal aunt and uncles) and managed to finish the closing weeks my final college term in June all while making incremental sense of my new part time-but full time social/emotional and physical lifestyle realities.

 

Based on my L’ Arche and camp Kinkora connections and experience I was offered jobs specializing in service to adults with intellectual disabilities at Valois residence in Pte. Claire and as a vocational services workshop educator at Progressive workshop in Lachine. That summer, I met with Jack Carlin and his team for the first time, and made what would become the first connections of a long and memorable professional career…

 

By the autumn of that significant and life altering year, I had saved enough money to purchase an airline ticket and subsequently spent three months (September- December 1979) traveling in Great Britain + one week in Paris.

 

I returned home, was offered a new job (my mother provided the telephone note she had earlier written down) with the same social services group I had just left (now with a new team and location at Brunswick workshop) and moved out again, this time with a roommate my (lifelong Kinkora friend and song writing partner Kirk), some second-hand furniture and a crib.

 

Be Not Afraid:

 

My daily focus was now to be divided in significantly new ways…

 

Everything I ended up thinking/feeling/doing would be done by intuition and by trial and error.  

 

It was as if I had to remember and then be immediately good at things I’d never done, thought or even felt before.

 

Everything seemed scary and new for which I had little or no true experience or confidence.

 

I am also aware that for one of our sakes (either yours or mine) I’ve once again quickly skipped through much (or even most) of the deeply emotional and often complicated details of this part of my narrative…

 

Sorry, but I’m still not finished with my safe and quick skipping…

 

I worked with the, at first privately, then publicly funded WIAS-WIRC (Progressive + Brunswick) from 1979 until 1985…and lived, close, in a 3 and ½ room apartment building in NDG.

 

At first, my beautifully cute-nosed daughter had been living with her mother in their own 4-plex upper flat in Verdun. I stayed with my daughter, sharing parenting arrangements with her mom as a single dad in their upper flat every second weekend.

 

Eventually my daughter and her mom moved together to Ottawa to share a home rental location with 2 other class-schoolmates so that new opportunities for her mom’s education at the University of Ottawa could be pursued. Grade 1 elementary school classwork in Ottawa for our daughter would also begin. 

 

I had helped with a bit of that move-in energy and had been able to meet both of her significant house-schoolmates. 

 

Around that same time, it also dawned on me that pursuing my own higher-educational possibilities required its own attention

 

McGill

 

In retrospect, resigning from the non-union affiliated but public social services agency Brunswick (WIRC) in July of ‘85 was an objectively ill-considered decision.  I now know that I could likely have easily negotiated with their management team an educational leave of absence without needing to resign a stable job, a residential lease and returning to live back home again with my parents, instead of cashing-out on my to-date retirement pension contributions and reverting back to a seniority status of zero instead of the 6 years I had accumulated at my departure…More info to come,,.

 

After obtaining an acceptance from the school of Social Work at McGill university and registering from and living in my parents’ home in Verdun, I began full time studies in September of 1985. 

During the month of July, I had also agreed to support my daughter’s short-term but full-time return to Montreal to live and go to school in September with her maternal grandmother. 

By sharing/coordinating my physical living arrangements with my daughter’s maternal grandmother, my parents, and a dear friend’s couch, I was able to successfully contribute to our daughter’s stability 

successfully stayed with McGill BSW program between 1085 until the end of my graduation in 1988…

Apart from managing my classwork and professional stage obligations throughout the three-year program, in July ‘85 I had also accepted part time employment from two different employers: as a residential services weekend staff position for physically impaired adults at The Cheshire Home, and a CCS summer camp job position for seniors at COM (Camp Orelda-Marion). 

In July ‘86 I moved into and lived for a full year in a small 3 and 1/2 apartment in Verdun with my daughter and her mother. 

Since my daughter’s mother had also accepted a summer job at COM (where she had spent several of her own with her three sisters as residential campers and paid counsellors), we were able to share some new family time together in Verdun and the COM site location of St. Gabriel de Brandon. 

A close friend of my daughter’s mother had also accepted an invitation to join us that full summer and serve as our daughter’s mother’s helper.

In September of ’87, at the end of second enjoyable summer at COM, we all moved together into large 6½ flat in the mile-end district of Central Montreal… 

The cost of maintaining a 6 and 1/2 room upper-level cold flat was expensive and required some serious elementary + undergraduate + graduate schoolwork coordination + the securing needed sources of fresh income…

I was able to accept a new employment offer and for two years held the position of Director of COM.

During the off-season between the two years, I worked for the camp, I also held the position of recreation specialist with adolescents at the Allen Memorial Psychiatric inpatient pavilion on Montreal’s Royal Victoria Hospital.

That psychiatric hospital position at the Vic was one position from my career that I didn’t enjoy, wasn’t particularly motivated to be good at and from which I sent a letter of resignation… It also prompted my only application for provincial unemployment benefits

While waiting for the unemployment money to come, (6 weeks from the date of application) I directly applied for, successfully attained and in early 1989 began working at a first paid social work gig as an ARH (Agent de Relations Humaine) with Ville Marie Social Services. 

The prospect of securing financial/physical/emotional lifestyle stability felt good and somehow at age 30 long overdue. 

 

By the end of the lease period of our expensive central Montreal Mile-End 6½ and at the advent of being assigned employment in an easily accessible point of service location in lower Westmount, it seemed wholly logical and comforting, as we discussed, that we should return to our familiar Verdun neighbourhood, and live as close to the St. Lawrence waterfront as we could afford…

A picturesque 6 and ½ upper rental on Allard Avenue became available near our river so we took it…and began a peaceful time walking, cycling, eat ice-cream cones and identify birds…

A new and familiar/comfortable family phase had begun…

 

FACE and the 1993 reform of health and social services

 

The comprehensive PSBGM school program that was selected for our daughter to attend upon her return to Montreal from Ottawa was bilingual, grades 1 to 11, Fine Arts Core Education program known simply as FACE

 

During her earliest years at FACE our daughter would take the school bus back and forth at scheduled hours for pick-up and return. By grade 3 we had begun the teaching process of having her learn to independently use Montreal’s public transportation system (bus and metro). By grade 4 when we had begun again to live in Verdun, our daughter was already becoming a veteran of the downtown rush hour dynamic. 

 

The central downtown location of FACE school and the lower Westmount location of my VMSSC job had been conveniently situated in relative proximity to one another

 

Another significant feature of my personal journey towards eventual becoming a grandfather was that in1993, the entire provincial health and social services network was reformed. 

Existing employees within the entire public services network were all provided notice of the upcoming changes and offered the opportunity, depending on their individual employee status (permanent, contact, part time or full time, ) to maintain their current employee status (seniority/role/point of service,) or choose to carry their existing profile status into new positions within the entire modified. reformed network.

As a young 32 year old employee with a contract status in the position I had only held for three years, my options were somewhat limited…I studied the full list of professional service roles itemized within the entire provincial health and social services network and given my relatively new and vulnerable ( non-permanent) employee profile status, I put my name on the list for transferring out of the VMSSS contract ARH position I currently held and (armed with a competitive CV that included my employment/volunteer/academic qualifications) and onto the list to work again with the vocational service team at LPSTT where I worked for 6 years pre-McGill years (formerly the Progressive/Brunswick workshop teams providing service for adults who had intellectual disabilities).

 

Since everyone within the existing Health and Social Services network was actively managing adjustments to their individual career trajectory, a person’s place on the unionized list of the positions they currently held was of strategic importance.

Securing a new position within the reformed, yet unnamed entity, in a capacity of which I was already familiar and could build on a developing expertise, seemed the only responsible way for a young father of an already 13-year-old daughter to move forward.

 

Ok…Its more than time for me to fess-up and humbly admit that I’ve become quite lost in this deep re-telling of all the story contained in the As I Recall opening chapter of “On the Hunt…”

When I began writing the rough draft pages of this book just after my granddaughter’s 10th birthday and a bit before I left to visit with my family in western Canada, I had been excited by the potential of writing a book and using its sale as an inexpensive lead magnet offer to a customer base who was potentially interested in lifestyle topics relevant to my small business target audience niche of Canadian grandfathers.

The model I was using was fully described the online e-book The 1 Book Millions Method by Mike Shreve of Peaceful Profits…PeacefulProfits.com

I had been trying to stay faithful to the described model, but after several months with no more than 20 or so rough draft pages written, it became apparent to me that I didn’t have the recommended number of short book publishable pages in me (120+) to sustain my own interest or confidence as a story teller, a wannabe small business owner or even as a fledgling internet website owner with no current list members or audience.

I started investigating simpler options that could be more of a fit for my current skill set before I rolled up my tent altogether and ran away from my post retirement supplemental income plans.

Then I found something that had manageable potential but that I had to buy course membership access into offered by Designrr.  The adage “in for a penny- in for a pound” would describe my increasingly desperate motivations adequately.  BTW any of these side interests that I’ve taken on have cost me growing amounts of credit card debt without yet providing me a single penny in return for any of my investment.  Wish me luck… app.designrr.io

So, writing a smaller (shorter) e-book with formatting and publishing supports built into their product offer started to make the notion of assembling a tribe of 13+ Canadian grandfathers who might buy a lead magnet e-book offer from me began to make sense

That’s why I wrote that salvaging/completing this extended note and publishing it on my Chez Pa website as a new post update there and using the whole article as an orientation statement for the FB Canadian Grandfathers group that I intend to create and as an opening chapter of my “On the Hunt…” e-book that my tribe of Canadian grandfathers can help me write the other 13 chapters on (one Great Canadian Grandfather from each of the provinces and territories).  So that’s the new plan…

 

Hello again…..Welcome to Another Chez Pa update… This one is being written on May 7/22, and so I’d like to begin by acknowledging my having missed the Covid-19’s second anniversary update on March 11…

The last time I wrote to provide you with a general Chez Pa update was a little over a year ago when I was also able to acknowledge the first anniversary of the global pandemic scourge.

Everyone in my family has had at least two vaccination jabs (including Goodness and Gracious who are the youngest of us) and several of us have already had their third vaccination and are scheduled for receiving their fourth (my wife and I are scheduled for May 20).

The Beijing Olympics came and went this past summer/ Canada and members of its First Nations community struggled with the discovery of unmarked graves on the grounds of multiple residential schools/ Ottawa was the central hub of a national truckers caravan protesting vaccine obligations:/Vladimir Putin’s war against the people of Ukraine continues/economic recovery grapples with sustainable sectorial development and inflationary pressures/The January 6/21 insurrection committee is preparing to hold its public hearings against the backdrop of mid-term American elections and the latest legal maneuvers between Donald Trump and multiple court jurisdictions/the potential US Supreme court overturning of Roe vs Wade has become a reignited worry…

 

Guy Lafleur and Mike Bossey died within a couple of weeks of each other…

One of our dearest family friends. Lorraine, also died in late April/22…

I think it’s time for me to call my mom and visit her with Goodness and Gracious for Mother’s Day and hit publish…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mark Leblanc

About the author

62-year-old grandfather of Goodness and Gracious, my two beautiful elementary school age granddaughters. After a 40+ year social services career in Montreal between 1978, and 2019, I am currently looking forward to. becoming a full- time blogger and affiliate marketer specializing in topics and products of interest to Canadian Grandfathers. Creating and managing a website known as Chez Pa.com is part of my new lifestyle and plan...Hello/Bonjour/Welcome/Bienvenue

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